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Exercise Increases Energy and Fights Fatigue

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Updated January 03, 2010

Exercise is a great way to increase your energy level and fight off feelings of fatigue. Just a few minutes a day of exercise can really transform how you feel and how much energy you have to put toward getting through your day.

A review of 12 large-scale studies on the connection between exercise and fatigue was made. The studies took place from 1945 to 2005, and each study measured the amount of physical activity that participants were doing and how much energy or fatigue the participants experienced. All of the studies found a direct link between a reduced risk of fatigue for people who were physically active compared to those who were inactive.

Other research shows that even among people with chronic illness like cancer or heart disease, exercise can ward off feelings of fatigue and help people feel more energized.

The trick, of course, is exercising when you feel fatigued. Tired people generally do not want to put on their sneakers and go for a run. The good news is that even a little bit of increased activity seems to be helpful. You don’t need to run 8 miles a day to feel more energy; a 15-minute walk can do wonders.

If you are trying to exercise for more energy, the hardest thing to do is schedule the time. Choose a consistent time that you can exercise daily (like first thing in the morning, just before lunch or when you get home from work). Make your goal to exercise at least 4 days a week and never go more than 1 day without exercising. That way, you'll never get out of the habit of exercising.

More on Exercise:
Make Exercise Fun
Hidden Benefits of Exercise
Sleep Better Through Exercise
Your Immune System and Exercise
Want a Better Sex Life? Exercise
Learn to Love Exercise
Your Balance and Exercise
Increase Your Life Expectancy With Exercise
Mental Fitness and Exercise
Strong Bones and Exercise
Your Social Life and Exercise
Improve Your Mood With Exercise

Sources:

Puetz TW, Beasman KM, O'Connor PJ. The effect of cardiac rehabilitation exercise programs on feelings of energy and fatigue: a meta-analysis of research from 1945 to 2005. Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2006 Dec;13(6):886-93.

Puetz TW. Physical activity and feelings of energy and fatigue: epidemiological evidence. Sports Med. 2006;36(9):767-80.

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